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    Gæstespil - PARASHURAMA


    Sunday, May 28, 2017

    PARASHURAMA

     

    Perfomer: Mario Barzaghi (Teatro dell'Albero), pupil of M° Kalamandalam K. M. John

     

    Parashurama (a classical dance theatre show in Kathakali style) is a new production by Teatro dell'Albero a center of study and theatre research since 1999. Parashurama, Shiva's devotee, is Vishnu's sixth avatar; he was born with the aim of fighting harassment and injustices kings and warriors exerced over Brahmins and other castes. He is depicted with ax, bow and arrows. Kerala was born from the groove determined by the throw of his axe. Parashurama, a wise warrior, created
    also Kalaripayattu, an ancient Indian martial art which deeply influenced Kathakali.

     

     

    Kathakali literally means: "telling stories". A Kathakali representation lasts the whole night starting at sunset and ending at first light. In India there are several forms of classic dance theatre such as Kathakali which is however one of the most important and best known. In Western countries Kathakali has gained fame, appreciation and respect for the seriousness and accuracy of its training and has fascinated great masters of Western theatre such as Jerzy Grotowski, Eugenio Barba, Ariane Mnouchkine. Kathakali is a great theatre machine: through study and practical exercises the actorsdancers have been training since their infancy to reach a perfect form. It's a global work, a union of theatre, music, dancing, singing, writing, make up, costume ( to be seen as a moving scenography, too). To build a character the body is subdivided into bands or blocks: an upper and lower part which are, in turn, subdivided so as to underline micro details. As an example let's take the KALASHA of eyes: it is a rhytmic sequence where eyes dance so as to draw the greatest attention and lead spectators to an integral and harmonious vision. Like in Michelangelo's works we admire the artwork and not the effort of the artist, / so in Khatakali we are attracted by the character, and not by the effort of the actor. In Kathakali the epic aspect of the story correspond with the epic aspect of the training. Parashurama is the new Kathakali production by Teatro dell'Albero, a center of study and theatre research since 1999. Parashurama, Shiva's devotee, is Vishnu's sixth avatar; he was born with the aim of fighting harassment and injustices kings and warriors exerced over Brahmins and other castes. He is depicted with ax, bow and arrows . Kerala was born from the groove determined by the throw of his axe. Parashurama, a wise warrior, created also Kalaripayattu, an ancient Indian martial art which deeply influenced Kathakali. The story that we are presenting is taken from the work of Sita Swayamvar. This story talks about King Janaka, who is holding a tournament. The challenge is to lift the bow of Shiva and re-tie the cord. The winner will marry Sita, the King's daughter. Many princes and warriors participate, even trying to work in teams, but none of them are successful. Only Rama (avatar of Vishnu) is successful. He not only lifts the bow, but while re-knotting the cord, he breaks it. The Kathakali piece begins here. When the tiraśsīla, the curtain, is taken off, Parashurama. appears. The warrior is meditating, hears a loud noise, wakes up and wonders what the noise is. At first he thinks the noise is coming from the mountains bumping into each other. In fact, a long time ago the mountains had wings and they often collided. But it is no longer like that because Indra, 1 (Parashurama recalls the event, taking on the appearance of Indra, the chief of the gods), cut off the wings of the mountains and fastened them forever into the ground. Parashurama is curious and comes close to the noisy spring. He sees a parade of musicians in the distance. He shows the various drums, flutes and antique rounded trumpet are played. He prays, hoping to receive an explanation from their god. He sees that the person who broke Shiva's bow is in the procession. Shiva is his lord and he is highly devoted to him. The first part ends, and we only see Parashurama. After the second entrance of the tiraśsīla, the curtain, the second part begins. Parashurama often looks to his left as if there were four characters: an old King with a thick, white beard, Dasharatha; a beautiful young girl, Sita; a young warrior, Rama (husband of Sita) and Lakshmana, Rama's brother. In this second part, from the beginning to the end, Parashurama reviles them, reproving Rama and the ancient father. This is what he says: "A long time ago I saved you, because you didn't have children, then you made a great offering to the gods, they gave you two wives and you had two children from each one of them. One of them has broken the bow of my lord, I should have killed you; now I would do well to kill all of you. You know what happened to various warriors. You know why I killed them. Once I was praying and all of a sudden I heard my mother crying. I understood immediately that my father had been killed by a warrior King. I tell you: not once, or twice but twenty-one times I will kill all the warriors." Parashurama shows his anger with insults, curses and gestures that clearly demonstrate his disgust. The four characters repeatedly ask him to calm down. Our scene finishes with Parashuruma even more angry at the person responsible for breaking his lord's bow (he ends up kicking the old King). But how will the story end? After patiently putting up with the insults and curses, in the moment that Parashurama kicks the king, Rama gets angry, showing the sign that reveals that he also is an avatar of Visnhu. Parashurama is forced to calm down and ask for forgiveness.

     

     

     

    MARIO BARZAGHI

    Mario Barzaghi, actor and director of Teatro dell'Albero, started studying Kathakali in 1981 after meeting Teatro Tascabile di Bergamo. He has been practising this form of theatre for 35 years under the guidance of his Master Kalamandalam K. M. John. He danced with him in India, Europe and Latin America. In 1985 and 1999 he studied with Kalamandalam Padmanabhan Nair (Master of Kalamandalam K. M. John) who gave him the blessing to be able to dance (arangettam or initiation to dance). He's now working with Master Sankar Lal Sivasankaran Nair to prepare a demonstration show focused on the connection between Kathakali and Kalaripayattu. Together with the other members of Teatro dell'Albero he has built the demonstration show An Athlete of Heart: an actor swinging between Eastern and Western with the aim of demonstrating the connection existing between the art of Western and Eastern actors. This work has been presented in theatres, universities, academies, schools, festivals, theatrical reviews in Italy and in many European and Latin American countries.

    www.Tealbero.it

     

     

     

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    Man - Fre mellem / Mon - Fri between 9.00 - 15.00

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