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The
Open Page


Theatre - Women - Politics

 

CONTENTS

 

The Open Page - OPEN QUOTES

Lieve Delanoy (Belgium/Peru) - RETURNING TOANDAHUAYLAS

Rabab Ghazoul (Britain) - JOURNEYS AROUND A WORD

Ermanna Montanari (Italy) - POLITTTTTTTICAL THEATRE

Malika Boussouf (Algeria) - WOMAN, THEATRE, POLITICS - IN ALGERIA

Sally Rodwell (Aotearoa New Zealand) - WEEK IN WELLINGTON

Jill Greenhalgh (Wales) - THE BEST YEARS OF YOUR LIFE

Rosa Ileana Boudet (Cuba) - MEMORY: A BURNING FLAME

Brigitte Kaquet (Belgium) - FOR A LONG TIME I HAVE BELIEVED

Leah Thorn (Britain) - I PLACE MY STONES

Geddy Aniksdal (Norway) - CORNERSTONES

Roberta Gandolfi (Italy) - EDY CRAIG AND SUFFRAGE THEATRE

Julia Varley (Britain) - RED CARNATIONS AND A ROSE

Lene Thiesen (Denmark) - ONE SERVANT AND FOUR MASTERS

Pol Pelletier (Canada) - FROM POLITICS TO SPIRITUALITY

Griselda Gambaro (Argentina) - HISTORY OF A FRUSTRATED ADAPTATION

Rachel Rosenthal (USA) - EARTH FIRST

Jung-Soon Shim & Gil-Cha Hur (Korea) - COMING AND GOING AT SUNDOWN

Maria Shevtsova (Australia) - THEATRE THAT SPEAKS TO CITIZENS

Swasthi Widjaja Bandem & Desak Nyoman Suarti (Bali) - DANCE AND MUSIC IN...

Aline Soler & Marie-Josée Ordener (France) - GUIGNOL IN THE SQUARES

Diana Ferrero (Italy) - FADELA ASSOUS: A LIFE DEVOTED TO THEATRE

The Open Page - OPEN LETTERS, OPEN NEWS

 

 

EDITORIAL

 

Politics - To keep on making theatre is in itself a political choice: opting for human relationships rather than mechanical, for intimacy rather than mass media, for memory and resistance rather than neglect and success. Politics has very different meanings across time and geography, and the meaning is constantly changing. Politics can quickly be related to power: a way to keep in power, or a way to criticise, overthrow, counterbalance and take power; a way to live, survive and deal with power or a way of separating from power and of refusing. Women in the world are now feeling a greater political responsibility and are making a point of having their opinions heard. In theatre, women create performances which take a position, denounce or inform; women give new importance to the contents of shows and resolutely take part in social movements and activities. For a long time the form was the content and the stress for change and development was on how to make theatre, now it seems that many women are pointing towards giving more consideration to what is said with theatre and where they place their work.

 

For the third issue of The Open Page dedicated to the theme Theatre-Women-Politics, we have gathered articles which give an image of the very different way in which politics affect women's work in theatre. Some women have experienced great changes in their countries, with revolutions, counter-revolutions, dictatorships and new unstable democracies; others have been engaged in political theatre or still are, but in a different way. Some women need to confront contemporary political issues; others prefer to keep a distance between their artistic work and their demonstrations in support of the causes they believe in. Some women have already proved their commitment in the past, but have remained largely obscure; others do not speak of politics, but of funding, censorship, economic pressures, family and village structures.

 

We have received many articles and we have had to choose amongst them. Judith Malina, Ariane Mnouchkine and Franca Rame had to be part of this issue of The Open Page. Their important political engagement in theatre, their struggle which has resisted time, their courage and integrity are certainly an example for many of us. But to leave room for less known theatre practitioners, we decided to print just some quotes from texts by these three women as a reminder of their vision and work. The articles should be read taking into account the context within which the authors are active. We do not necessarily agree with the positions taken, but we value a space where disagreement is possible and where differences can be shared. We wanted to keep a balance, but we are aware that some voices are missing. With the next issue we hope that our horizons will reach out to all corners of the world. The articles could be subdivided into general, historical, interviews and dialogues, particular projects and poetry... but the words quickly abandon one category to reach out for another. All articles have geographical references, as if the reality of Politics keeps us attached to the earth. Going from one article to the next we are reminded of injustice and poverty, of isolation and war, of unemployment and exploitation, but also of hope, joy, dignity and dreams. The written words of these women remind us of the socially active role of theatre today and of the personal sense that each of us must give to our actions, both on stage and in life.

 

Julia Varley

Holstebro, March 1998

 

 

 

 

no. 3 - March 1998


op 3 lille

 

 

Editorial Board:

Geddy Aniksdal, Maggie Gale, Julia Varley

Contributing Editors:

Gilly Adams, Jill Greenhalgh

Production Coordinator:

Rina Skeel

Cover:

Marco Donati

 

With special thanks to:

Grenland Friteater

Chris Fry

 

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